Search
  • DWT Botany Group

Conifer Reccie & Event - Fri/Sat 6 & 7th March 2020

Updated: Mar 9

Bill, Steve and myself met at the Grove carpark at Hamsterley Forest and after a wee chat, Bill laid out the plans for the following day's conifer id outing. This area has a fine collection of trees and Bill is just so knowledgable about them all. Spruces, Firs, Hemlocks, Larches, Pines, Redwoods and more, we saw them all and learnt so much about every one.



The Grove car-park , Hamsterley Forest and it's fine collection of conifers


In some places, closely related species are growing next to each other, making it brilliant for id purposes.



The island in the Grove Pond with Scots, Lodgepole & partly hidden behind, Corsican Pines

So we (and you will tomorrow!) get to know how to tell species by their overall appearance.

Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffrey)

European Larch (Larix decidua)



Wellingtonia (Sequoiadendron giganteum)


Or by their bark

The trunk of a Douglas Fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii]


and cones

A Douglas Fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii] cone - note the three prongs


The small cones of the Western Hemlock-spruce (Tsuga heterophylla)

and leaves


The 5-needled Bhutan (Pinus wallichiana) and 3-needled Jeffrey (Pinus jeffrey) Pines together for comparison


The common and our only native pine tree, the Scot's Pine [Pinus sylvestris] with it's 2 needles


Corsican Pine (Pinus nigra subsp. laricio) which like the Scots Pine and Lodgepole Pine has 2 needles (Corsican Pine)


Lawson's Cypress [Chamaecyparis lawsoniana]



Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica)

Larch cones, left to right: Larix x eurolepis (hybrid larch), L. kaempferi (Japanese larch), and L. decidua (European larch)



Following on from the reccie, the event on the Saturday had 10 people attend and a fantastic day it was and we have all learned a great deal from Bill - an excellent teacher as well as expert treeman. Copies of his really useful handout will be available on Sunday at Chopwell Wood where we will be applying our new skills.

0 views

©2020 by Durham Botany Group.